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January 7, 2004     Sentinel Tribune
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January 7, 2004
 

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TRIBUNE Area Focus Wednesday, January 7, 2004 Page 7 ilies matter Specialist Service and four is is something a new year us all. For me it of office to Extension Worthington. go full cir- I began in in 1988, I nty for Years. joke that gotten clos- drove there county roads so I took the Plus, I child who went a and house. That miles back- Slayton since of town. So, has big changes y of Service to 18 regional throughout Most counties satellite office. co-work- has done a talking about in his news col- We know will be and we We will continue the people of as best we can. know yet is all work. have asked 'new job." Yes, but my posi- began mid- to changes by in the Extension family rela- its big past new posi- awhile. - --- am lucky to of what Working on. I had With Positive fl many aspects education. Our llow even more People in agen- is done with than directly continue develop much for parents to make their job easier and to give them support. In my job, I will also be working more with the Parents Forever program. This is the program for fami- lies who are undergoing transitions due to separation and divorce. There again, we train the people who work directly with the program as well as helping communities set up their own program. I'll continue to do news- paper columns and radio work. That's always been something I really enjoy. I'll also continue working with leader trainings for study groups and community groups. In fact one topic we will be working on for next year is grand-parenting. There are just seven of us in Minnesota working as Family Relations Specialists. So, that means we don't get to work as closely with all the collaborative groups we once did. In Murray Count:,', the Youth and Family Task Force was one such collabo- ration. Fulda teachers Marcene Elder and Shirley Sturm, Marie Henriksen, and I started that. We attended a conference together and then asked oth- ers to be a part of the group. Many others in the commu- nity including Dodi Haugen, ECFE Director, quickly joined us. We were able to do many things over the years. But, change marches on; the Task Force is now focusing on an Early Childhood Initiative. The Chemical Abuse Prevention Team and Child Abuse Prevention Council were good things to work with, too. 4-H was also in my posi- tion. When I first came to the county, my title was County Extension Agent, 4- H Youth Development. In the early 90's, our 4-H Program Coordinator Margie Anderson, became full-time. I continued working with the Eatstand, 4-H Incorporated Board, Consumer judging, organizing and" sometimes teaching a variety of project trainings and setting up the 4.H Endowment. County Fair and State Fair were also on my calendar. It was a lot of work but great to see all the families. It was also fun to work on improving things a little bit each year or adding to make it a better experience for the kids. =g concerned & responsible and businesses support the churches, and their activities. Westbrook / Walnut Grove lie al Funeral , Home Minnesota" 507-274-6700 Street Westbrook, MN. Tracy 507-859-2161 Ph. 532-9430 Walnut Grove, MN all Maynard's Food Center MN MN. 629-4510 . Revere, l.,ucan, , Avoca - MAIN 752-7352 To LAUGHLIN. NEVADt 54 Grove, MN 962 MN 274-5555 Westbrook, MN. Sentinel Tribune Westbrook, MN Phone 274-6136 1-800-410-1859 Koblegard Auto 859-2220 Walnut Grove, MN. Your local long term provider since 1961 49 First Ave. Westbrook, MN 56183 507-274-6155 Murray County has espe- cially been a great place to work due to my Extension co-workers Nancy, Wendy, Dave, Margie, Karen and Bonnie. We have also shared the space with Economic Development and Personnel with Bob and most recently, Heidi. A respect for each other's work and a willing- ness to help each other in a pinch has always been so evi- dent there. The satellite office in Murray County will keep on being a place where you will be warmly received with every attempt made to respond to your question or need. Even though I have a dif- ferent office, I count myself lucky that my home contin- ues to be here! I'll look for- ward to working with Murray County in a little dif- ferent way plus be a volun- teer and resident. Best wish- es for 2004 to each of you! Cold creek WALNUT GROVE -- With the recent frigid temperatures Plum Creek south of Walnut Grove was frozen solid. Bovine Spongiform Encepha-lopathy By Nancy Pieske Murray County Extension On December 23, the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture announced the diagnosis of a possible case of BSE in a dairy cow in Washington State. BSE is caused by virus-like protein particles called prions. It is a chron- ic degenerative disease affecting the nervous sys- tem in cattle. BSE is trans- mitted to cattle when they consume contaminated feed (meat and bone meal from BSE infected cattle). The'disease agent has never been found in muscle meat or in milk. It is found in central"nervous system tissue like brain and spinal cord and in retina (eye) tis- sue of infected cows. The government, the cattle industry and allied industries have put strin- gent safeguards (firewalls) in place to prevent BSE and the potential spread of the disease. Firewall #1: A series of import bans dating back to t989 ensure no live cat- tle and cattle products from countries where BSE had been found. The band was expanded in 1997 to include all European coun- tries, regardless of whether or not BSE had been found there. Firewall #2: In 1997, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned at- risk animal protein in cat- tle feed. While feeding ani- mal protein to cattle does- n't cause BSE (only infect- ed animal protein can spread the disease), the ban would keep the disease from spreading should it occur in the U.S. Firewall #3: The USDA has conducted a BSE surveillance program since 1990. In fiscal year 2002, USDA tested 19,990 cattle for BSE using a tar- geted surveillance approach designed to test the highest risk animals, including downer animals (animals that are non- ambulatory at slaughter), older animals and animals exhibiting signs of neuro- logical distress. More information is available at the following agency wet sites: -MN Dept. of Agriculture: http://www. mda,zamaa -MN Board of Animal Health: http://www.bah. state.mn.us U.S. Dept. of Agriculture: http://www. U of M's Center for Animal Health and Food Safety: htto://www.cahfs. umn.edu SDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service: httD://www.aDhis. usda.gov U.S. Food and Drug Administration: www.fda.gov National Cattlemen's Beef Assn. BSE Information: http://www. bseinfo.org ROOM & AIR PACKAGES 00ms259" Extension offering beef cattle home study course Beef cattle reproduc- tive management for both large and small producers is the subject of a home study course offered by the U of M Extension Service this winter. The course is entitled "Reproductive Management," and includes 6 lessons covering the basics of reproduction for beef cattle producers. This is the second year that this management course is offered to beef cattle producers. The course is designed to pro- vide producers with the information necessary to make decisions to improve profitability. Lesson topics include health manage- ment for reproduction, nutrition effects on repro- duction, Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) and genetics for improved reproduction, heifer devel- opment synchronization and raising versus buying replacements. An added bonus will be an appendix with advanced reproduc- tive technology informa- tion. The course provides an educational opportunity for those wlao find it diffi- cult to attend meetings due to work schedules, family commitments, or geographic location. This is the 5th Beef Home Study Course offered by the U of M Extension Service. Registrations received by Jan. 15 dead- line will guarantee course enrollment. Class lessons will be mailed to partici- pants every 6-10 days beginning in Feb. from the Pipestone County Extension Office. The course registration fee is $40, and covers the 6 les- sons, a 3-ring binder, sup- porting reference materi- als and postage costs. Materials from the first 4 course offerings (Breeding Herd Nutrition, Health Management, Pasture Management and Preparing for Value Based Marketing) are also avail- able. Additional informa- tion and registration forms are available from the Pipestone County Extension Office, 119 2nd Ave. SW, Suite #2, Pipestone, MN, phone 800- 967-2705 or 507-825-6715. Or, registration forms can be found at http://www.extension.umn. edu/county/pipestone under the "Programs, and then, "Home Study C o u r s e " headings. Extension is offering beef cattle reproductive manage- ment home study course By Philip Berg Extension Educator Beef cattle reproduc- tive management for both large and small producers is the subject of a home study course offered by the U of M Extension Service this winter. The course is entitled "Reproductive Management," and includes 6 lessons covering the basics of reproduction for beef cattle producers. This is the second year that this management course is offered to beef cattle pro- ducers. The course is designed to provide producers with the information necessary to make decisions to improve profitability. Lesson topics include health management for reproduction,  nutrition effects on reproduction, Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) and genetics for improved reproduction, heifer devel- opment, synchronization, and raising versus buying replacements. An added bonus will be an appendix with advanced reproduc- tive technology informa- tion. The course provides an educational opportunity for those who find it diffi- cult to attend meetings due to work schedules, family commitments or geograph- ic location. This is the fifth Beef Home Study Course offered by the U of M Extension Service: Registrations received by te January 15 deadline will guarantee course enrollment. Class lessons will be mailed to partici- pants every 6-10 days beginning in Feb. from the Pipestone County Extension Office. The course registra- tion fee covers the 6 les- sons, a 3-ring binder, sup- porting reference materials and postage costs. Materials from the first 4 course offerings (Breeding Herd Nutrition, Health Management, Pasture Management and Preparing for Value Based Marketing) are also avail- able. Additional informa- tion and registration forms are available from the Pipestone County Extension Office, 119 2rid Ave. SW, Suite #2, Pipestone, MN, phone 800- 967-2705 or 507-825-6715. Or, registration forms can be found at http://www.extension.umn. du/county/pipestone (under the "Programs," then "Home Study Course" headings).