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SENTINEL TRIBUNE COMI00IUNITY Wednesday, Auguat 28, 2013 Page 6 GLANCES IN THE PAST FIFTEEN YEARS AGO August 26, 1998 Two new coaches joined the volleyball coaching staff this year. Eric Larson is the new 'C' squad coach, Natalie Ross is in her sec- ond season as Varsity coach, and Linda Chapman will be the new 'B' squad coach. Scott Jans won Overall Champion and Grand Champion for Sheep- Market Wether at the Murray County Fair. For 32 years the Cottonwood County Cattlemen's Association has hosted one of the trib- utes to the beef industry in southern Minnesota -- The Beef Royale. The Beef Royale was held at Maurice and Hilda Mitchell's Double M Ranch, Westbrook, on August 19. THIRTY YEARS AGO August 25, 1983 On Monday of this week, Doug Byers and Roger Knudson of Westbrook purchased and took over operations of the former Cenex LP Gas Plant here. Knudson will continue to operate Local Oil Co. Byers will manage the busi- ness. Art Kuehl was honored on his 76th birthday Sunday evening. Forty members of his family were present for supper at the Dovray Manor, including grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren. Twenty-nine women turned ont last Sunday afternoon for the Annual Ladies Golf Tournament at Rolling Hills Golf Club. Jan Lindaman, who was the runner-up to Leigh Klasse last year, was the champion. FORTY FIVE Years Ago August 29, 1968 Leo Vortherms and Peter Schoborg were cutting hay on the Milford Anderson farm about 6 miles south- east of Westbrook when one of their tractors disap- peared. Leo had left his tractor and when he looked back, it had disappeared, into a 15-ft. ditch, going in head first. Attempts to pull the machines out with trac- tors were unsuccessful, so the Westbrook village crew was called. Russ Mortenson and Norris Einertson answered the call with the village hoist. Burdette Wiecks, new principal at Westbrook High School, was on the job Tuesday when high school students registered for classes. Westbrook and Storden will play host this weekend to 92 horseshoe pitchers from around the state as the three day MN State Horseshoe Pictching Tournament starts Saturday afternoon. Protect pollinators while trying to protect your crops By Robert Koch and Mafia Spivak, Entomologists, U of MN Ext. Honey bees and native bees forage in and near soy- bean and cornfields, especial- ly during dry weather. When treatment decisions are being made for pests of these crops, it is important to consider minimizing the risk to these pollinators. Bees are the most impor- tant pollinators of our fruits, vegetables, and crops includ- ing alfalfa hay that feed our farm animals. Honey bees and thousands of native bee species rely on the flowers they pollinate for good nutri- tion and health. Bees are being pushed to the tipping point by various factors, such as disruption of natural habi- tats, diseases and parasites, and widespread overuse of pesticides. Producer knowledge of basic bee biology can help protect bees from pesticides. Bees forage throughout the growing season from sun up to sun down when temper- atures are above 50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Honey bees fly an average of two miles on each foraging trip, searching for flowers over an 8,000-acre area surrounding the hive or apiary. Native bees generally fly within half mile of their nest. If flowers are blooming, bees will for- age on them. Beekeepers cannot close up the hive during a pesticide application because the bees will suffocate. Moving the bees is not a viable option because bees return to their original site unless they are moved out of their foraging range, which is more than three miles away. Locations to place bee hives are difficult to come by, and it is even harder to find locations where the bees are out of range of pesticide application. In a July 3, 2013 article LAND AND BUILDING SITE AUCTIONS BY SEALED BIDS Thursday, September 12, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. Storden Community Center- Storden, MN (Located across the street from First Security Bank) Sealed Bids (with the privilege of increasing same) will be received by Merlyn Anderson, Attorney at Law, either by delivering the bids or mailing the bids to his otce at 25538 Broadway Avenue, Slayton, MN 556172 so the bids are received by.5 P.M. on September 11. Bidders can also submit sealed bids from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on September 12 at the Storden Community Center to Medyn Anderson or the personal representative of the estate, Robert Gass, who will both be at the Storden Community Center at that time and date. All bids will be opened at 1:30 p.m. on September 12 and bidders will be allowed to increase their bid at that time. Bidding Process: Bidders can submit sealed bids in the following manner: 1. Land only 2. Building site only 3. Combined land and building site bid Legal Description of Land: NW1/4NW1/4 & E1/2 NWI/4, less 7.55 acre building site, all in Section 19, Amo Town- ship, Cottonwood County, Minnesota containing 112.77 acres of which 111.69 are tillable. The land has a 65.2 bushel corn base with a 1155 bhshel direct yield & 134 bushel CC corn yield.. The land has a 39.4 bushel soybean base with a 1155 bushel direct yield and a 39 bushel CC soybean base with a 1155 bushel direct yield and 39 bushel CC soybean yield. The land has a very attractive topography, shows good farm practice during past years & currently shows a very good corn crop. The building site is excluded and is being sold by separate bids. The land is being rented and the successful bidder will be permitted to come on the land and prepare the land for the 2014 crop year after the 2013 crop has been harvested. Bids for the land should be submitted on 112.77 acres. Building Site: The building site consisting of 2.5 acres adjacent to the south boundary of County Road No. 56 has been surveyed and the boundaries are cleady marked. It consists of a nice two-story house with 3 bedrooms and a hallway upstairs and a downstairs bedroom, bathroom, dining room, kitchen, front entryway and a nice attached 2-car garage with an inside door from the house to the garage and a separate large machine shed. The property is connected to rural water and the wells have been capped. The septic system is being upgraded to meet Cottonwood County specifications. Stanley Egenes had planned to make this his retirement home. Taxes and Rent: Taxes due & payable in 2013 will be paid by Seller. Taxes due and payable in 2014 will be paid by Buyer. The total non-homestead taxes due and payable in 2013 are 53,884.00. The Seller will receive the 2013 cash rent. Terms on Land and Building Site: A 10% non-refundable earnest money payment on both tracts immediately af- ter the auction. Buyers will be required to sign Purchase Agreements immediately after the auction. Balances due and payable on the land and building site will be due on the date of closing, which both shall be on or before November 1st, 2013. Possession will be given on the date of closing. Updated Abstracts of Title will be provided Buyers. ]P 7 *Tr TM IJSEI]P Et] UI! )IL ! Location from Storden, MN: From the junction of Hwy 30 and County Road 55 (Shady Drive Inn is directly north across the highway), then 4 miles south on County Road 5 to the junction of County Road 55 and County Road 56, then west approximately 3/4ths of a mile. Land and building site are on south side of road. The address of the property is 37307 3550th Avenue- Storden, MN. Seller's attorney or representative will be at the Shady Drive Inn at Storden to meet potential buyers and take them on a tour of the property at 1 p.m. on Sunday, September 1st, Sunday, September 8th, and from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the sale day, September 12th. Seller reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any irregularities in the bidding, and to accept bids in any manner seller determines to be in the seller's best interest. Seller is representing the Stanley A. Egenes estate in these transactions. Announcements made at the auction take precedence over any and all advertising pertaining to this auction. Questions may be directed to: Merlyn Anderson, 2538 Broadway Avenue- Slayton, MN 56172 Phone No. (507) 836-6060 STANLEY A. EGENES ESTATE Merlyn Anderson, Attorney for the Estate 212721 in the NDSU Crop and Pest Report, Janet Knodel pro- vided several general recom- mendations for reducing pes- ticide risks to pollinators: Know and communicate with beekeepers about pes- ticide application schedules and products. Use economic thresh- olds and other IPM strategies. Economic thresholds ensure that pesticides are used only when crop losses prevented by pesticide use are greater than the cost of the pesticide and the application. Use pesticides with low toxicity and low residual to bees. For example, avoid using dusts or wettable pow- der insecticide formulations because they generally are more toxic to bees. Evening or early morn- ing applications are the least harmful to bees because fewer bees are foraging. Never apply pesticides outdoors on a windy day (winds higher than 10 mph) which could cause spray drift problems. Honey bees and native bees visit the flowers of soy- bean and many flowering weeds growing in and near soybean fields. As soybean aphid populations continue building throughout the state, aphid management should take these pollinators into consideration. The University of Minnesota recommends making treatment decisions based on scouting program (i.e., getting into the field and counting aphids) and the following economic thresh- old for R1 (beginning bloom) to R5.5 (seeds expanding in pods) soybean: treat if populations are increasing, the majority (at least 80%) of plants are infested, and average aphid counts exceed 250 aphids per plant. This threshold can protect yields, reduce costs, conserve natural enemies of aphids and other pests, and reduce the risk of pests developing resistance to pesticides. Treating soybean aphid populations when they exceed this threshold will minimize unnecessary pesti- cide applications and reduce pollinator exposure to pesti- cides. To learn more about bee health from Extension, visit http://www 1 .extension. umn.edu/garden/honey-bees/ WESTBROOK SENIOR SERVICES Aug. 28- Sept. 4, 2013 Senior Nutrition Services serving at the The Recipe at 11:30 a.m. each operating day. Wednesday: Pasta salad, fruit, brownie Thnrsday: Dell Sandwich, cherry fluff Friday: Chow mein, ori- ental veggies, Jell-O Monday: No senior meal Tuesday: Tater Tot casse- role, mixed veggies, peaches Wednesday: Lasagna, green beans, lettuce salad Menus subject to change For reservations call Angle at The Recipe, 274-5352 by noon one day in advance. Lutheran Social Services is funded in part under the Older Americans Act under contract with the Southwest Agency on Aging. HERITAGE HOUSE MUSEUM By Carolyn Van Loh Reading through a student handbook from the mid '60s paints a picture of student life much different from today. Some standards from the 50-year-old handbook, how- ever, remain the same. Sportsmanship Code for the Spectator 1. I will applaud good plays made by the other teams. 2. I will consider our ath- letic opponents and their fans as guests and treat them accordingly. 3. I will consider the offi- cials as the proper authorities to make decisions without demonstration. 4. I will cheer the entry of both teams onto the playing field or floor. 5. I will do everything in my power to prevent heckling, booing, throwing objects or other acts of dis- courtesy. 6. I will support the team and coach regardless of the winning record of the teams and will consider the age and skill of the teams' members as factors in winning. 7. I will take pride in pro- moting good sportsmanship among the spectators, coach- es and players and will lend my wholehearted support to any program that strives for this. 8. I will attempt to become more familiar with the rules and fundamentals of the game in order to become a more intelligent and under- standing spectator. From the Department of Education, University of Minnesota. We applaud the WWG ath- letes and fans for continuing to demonstrate good sports- manship. I ::i TRACTORS '06 48S VERSAIILE. 1800 HRS .......................... S159,900 '032290 VERSATILE, 2000 HRS ........................................ 87,900 '88 936 VERSATILE, RS., 8000 HRS ...................... 528,900 '94 8S70 JD (4WD), 3500 HRS, QUAD SHIFT......$65,INO '10T8040 NH FWA, 700 HRS 305 HP ................ S169,0 '10T8040 NH FWA, 1380 HRS 305 HP .............. $152,900 '08 2210 B. VERSATILE, FWA, SS, RS., 570HRS. SI07,9(X] '05 2180 B VERSATILE, EWA, SS RS. 2,850 HRS. $I04,900 `05 2160 B. VERSATILE, EWA, SS, RS., 2995 HRS.S84,O 'OS TVI45 NH, BI-DI, 3000 HRS ........................... 565,900 '99 TVl40 NH,W/LOADER, 4900 HRS ................ $49,900 TW-35 FORD FWA, 5240 HRS .............................. 526,900 TC33D NH, LOADER, MFD, 1560 HRS ................... $15,0 '981530 NH BOOMER HYDRO,1800 HRS ............. $9.900 1466 IH 2/2350 LOADER, 6450 HRS ...................... $9,S00 IH 1086, 6700 HRS .................................................. ,900 400 EARMALL W/NEW IDEA LOADER ................... 52,500 SKIDLoADEDS '12 L-225 NH,CABIHEATIAC, 600 HRS ................ S37,500 '(N L170NH, 2300 HRS ......................................... $21,500 '01 LSq 7D NH, 5400 HRS CAB & HEAT ............... $12,900 '07 31710, CAB/HEAT, 1900 HRS .......................... 517)00 COMBINES '08 CR 9060 NH 750 HRS .................................. S219,90{) '00 TR-99 2255 HRS RWA .................................... %9,900 '98TR-98,19S0 HRS .............................................. $49300 '92 IR-% NH 4000 HRS ....................................... $19,900 '07 R-751040 HRS COMING IN ........................ S154,900 '93 R-52 GLEANER, 2500 HRS ............................. S22,900 7720 JD ............................................................ COMING IN 1440 IH, 3800 HRS ............... ........................... COMING IN GRAIN HEADS '10 74C NH 35'W/CRARY AIR ............................. S34,9C0 '04 74 NH 30' ...................................................... 519,000 "98 973 NH 25'. ....................................................... S1,750 '113020 CIH 35', ................................................... $31,500 93DJD ...................................................................... $9,900 '99 800 GLEANER 25' ............................................ $12,500 '93 320 GLEANER 20'. ............................................. 53,950 1020 IH, 18'. ..................................................... COMING IN HAY EQUIPMENT '06 BR780A NHTWINE/NET ................................ S15,900 NEWTONUHt IN-LINE 9WHEEL RAKE ................ S5,950 "116040 VERMEER DISC MOWER .......................... $6,950 260 JD DISC MOWER ............................................. S2,950 CORN HEADS 'IN 99( NH 81130 .................................................. 559,900 '08 99( NH 81130 .................................................. S54,90 'IN 98D NH 81130 ................................................. $38,900 "IN 98D NH 6R30 ................................................. 534,900 '08 98( NH 81130 .................................................. S31,000 '11 CAPELLO 81130 FITS JD .................................. S64,900 '9411630 GLEANER .................................................. 55,500 1063 IH, 61130 .................................................. COMING IN MIS(ELL.ANEOUS 550 DEMCO CART ................................................ S13,900 '07 WILRICH 20'SHREDDER ................................ $16,900 '95 LOFTNESS 20'SHREDDER ................................. $4,500 2500 REM VAC ....................................................... $12,9(10 SUDENGA 6"BRUSH AUGER (OEE DEMCO 550)...$I,100 TILLAGE 862NT WlSHEK 30' W/HARROW ........................ %9,900 513 WlL-RICH, SOIL-PRO 9-24 ............................ $42.500 '08 %7WIL-RICH, 7 30 ...................................... $27,900 '05 957WIL-RICH, 7-30 ....................................... $22,900 357 WIL-RICH, 7-30W/LEVELERS ........................ $9,900 5 30DMI .............................................................. $11,900 '09 KRAUS DOMINATOR 18 .................................. $39,900 '12 2410 JD CHISEL PLOW 31'. ............................. $36,500 2200 M&W EARTHMAsTER ................................ $24,900 '11 WlL-RICH QUAD X2, 45'. .......................... COMING IN 41.5' QUAD 5 WlL-RICH, 4 BAR ........................... S 16,900 S8'DMI TMII W/BASKET ....................................... A6,900 43'DMI TIGERMAIE, 4 BAR .................................. S14,900 37'4900 CASE ......................................................... $5,900 28'DEUTZ-ALLIS 1400 ........................................... $2,500 DRILLS & PLANTING 3600 KINZE 16R30 ASD-EV ............................... 5105,900 38C0 KINZE 24R30 ASD ..................................... $I05,900 2600 KINZE 16/31 ................................................ $39,900 3600 KINZE 16131 ................................................ $54,90 3600 KINZE 16R30 ................................................ %1,900 6100WIllIE 12R30 ................................................. $8,900 290 CONVEY-ALL SEED TENDER ......................... $11,9(]0 '07 PAR-KAN 150WEIGH WAGON ......................... %,900 / 1