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September 21, 2016     Sentinel Tribune
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SENTINEL TRIBUNE Wednesday, September 21, 2016 Page 6 GLANCES 1N THE PAST FIFTEEN YEARS AGO September 19, 2001 Last week during the terrorist attacks, local residents were concerned for the safety of the Kjorness family. Steve and Cathy Kjorness were visiting their son Mark and his family in Washington, D.C. Mark currently works at the Pentagon, although was not in the Pentagon that day. Members of the Kiwanis Club walked Saturday morning to the Rolling Hills Golf Club to raise money for the Children's Miracle Network. The group has been doing the project for 7 years. Lu Nelsen was the second oldest walker, at age 87. Ceasar Carlson was the oldest walker at age 94. Last week members of the building trades class were busy adding onto the media booth at the football field. The added space will make up for the loss of the booth on the north side of the field. THIRTY YEARS AGO September 16, 1986 At a special ceremony last Friday night at the Sheraton Park Place in Minneapolis, Jon Rongstad, owner of the Jon Rongstad Agency in Westbrook and Lakefield, became the 40th president of the MN Association of Professional Insurance Agents. Jon, who has been an agent since 1965, has served the past 8 years on the board of directors, and last year served as president elect. Monday aftemoon, the Westbrook Fire Department took delivery of their new lye truck. A representative from Heinan Fire Apparatus was on hand to turn over the keys. FORTY FIVE YEARS AGO September 16, 1971 Swede Norstegard and his crew started install- ing the irrigation system at the Rolling Hills Golf Club last Friday, and expects to be finished with the job sometime this week. The Westbrook Village Council will hold a spe- cial meeting Wednesday evening at the municipal building to discuss acquiring land for an air- port on a lease basis. Dennis Klute, who is remodeling the former Ervil Erickson home, started to rip apart an old counter-top desk. There were 3 boards nailed to the front of the desk, with a slot cut in the top. When he pulled these boards off, about 100 postcards and letters came tumbling out. The mail was addressed to many people here and all over the country, and none of it had ever been cancelled. Apparently, the desk had been in the old post office building. The letters were turned over to Postmaster John Patterson, who was instructed by postal authorities, to see that each of the pieces were delivered. 252490 Effective Oct. 1, I will be retiring from 47 years as a hairdresser. A heartfelt thanks go out to all my loyal customers, I will definitely miss our time spent together! Melody (Horkey) West will be taking over my position as manager of Estates Salon. She is looking forward to serving all your hair needs. Deb Lamb 50th anniversary Calvin and Ruth Rehborg will celebrate their 50th Wedding Anniversary on December 3, 2016. An Open House will be held in their honor 2-4 p.m. on Sunday, October 2, 2016. First Lutheran Church, 1200 4th Avenue, Worthington MN. The couple requests no gifts. How to Lose Your Farm to the Nursing Home "You know," the farmer said, "I never paid much attention to thinking about my estate. I just work. All the time. I guess I figured I'd have plenty of time to sort that stuff out when I got older. "Then my friend on the next farm over got sick and ended up in the nursing home. They took his whole farm. All his years of work just gone. Nothing left for the kids. I sure can't let that happen to me." We hear this stow often at Pat Lowther Law. Problems of the moment are always more urgent than problems of the future, until one day the future is here. And that future means if you failed to plan, you may lose your farm to the nursing home. The average cost of nursing home care in Minnesota is $75,360 per year. After age 65, 70% of individuals will need some long term care ser- vices and nearly 50% will spend time in a nursing home. Where will the money come from? Unless you've prepared for this expense, the most readily available asset the nursing home will want is your farm. There are several ways to plan ahead for nursing home expenses and not lose your farm: *One approach is to stash $350,000 in an account some- where, or reserve 80 acres, and use that when and if the time comes. *A more practical alterna- tive is to purchase long-term care insurance at about $2,000 per year, or purchase life insurance with a long-term care provision. This will cover nursing home expenses at a reasonable annual cost should care become necessary. *Another option is to gift your farm to your heirs. If the nursing home becomes neces- saw, the farm is not available as an asset because you no longer own it. The drawback is you must live five years after the gift is made before it becomes effective. Waiting to the last minute to gift is NOT a good idea. Another option is the Medical Assistance program available to people of very limited means. Most people, especially farmers, have far too many assets and income to qualify for this welfare pro- gram. Medical Assistance covers a certain amount of care and allows you or your spouse to keep a small amount of your assets - $3,000 for the nursing home spouse and about $120,000 for the spouse who is still living at home. Income limitations are just as restric- tive. In short, if you own a farm you'll veW likely exceed eligibility limits for this pro- gram. So, don't count on it. Only about 10% of Americans own long-term care insurance. What that says is most of those who would benefit from such pro- tection haven't been thinking about it. Or in other words, they may lose their farm with- out really Wing. Pat Lowther Law strongly recommends you call our office, so you don't become the neighbor who "lost his whole farm; all his years of work just gone." Call Pat Lowther Law at 651-216- 1440. (C) Pat Lowther 2016. All rights reserved. MIRROR OF BYGONE DAYS FIFTEEN YEARS AGO September 19, 2001 Friday night the WWG football players and coaches lined up holding American flags for the National Anthem, as a tribute to the victims of the terrorist attacks. Little would one know, but where Roger Meld's home sits at 851 Main St., Walnut Grove, was once Walnut Grove's only cigar manufacturing business. The cigar fac- tory operated between the years 1989 and 1901, but for how long is uncer- tain. The man in charge of operating the factory was Josph Posvar. In celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Wilder Pageant, the Walnut Grove Community Club Retail Committee is colleCting recipes from the community for a Walnut Grove cookbook. THIRTY YEARS AGO September 17, 1986 The emergency number 911 is now available for patrons served by the Walnut Grove Telephone Exchange and may be used to call in for reporting a fire, the police, or ambulance. Three filings have been received by City Clerk Karen Erickson. Filing for one four- year term was Ron Beens, incumbent, the two-year term, Bruce Thoma, who was appointed to fill out the term of Dean Fujan who had resigned, and Mayor Larry Anderson has refiled for the mayor's office. The position now held by Jeff Olson remains open. Olson has indicated he would not be a candidate for another term. FORTY FIVE YEARS AGO September 19, 1971 The last of 131 pheas- ants grown this summer as an FFA project were released Monday evening by Mark Kelly and Pat Lessman. A total of 150 day-old pheasant chicks were received in July, and Pat Lessman raised them in a brooder house. Approximately 300 people attended the open house at the new munici- pal building Saturday afternoon. The building was accepted by the vil- lage Saturday morning. Enrollment in the Walnut Grove schools is at an even 500 now. Although two grade school pupils were trans- ferred out, one new grade school pupil and two in the high school have brought the enrollment to 500. Murray County 4-H'ers experienced the Minnesota State Fair Minnesota 4-Hers from 86 counties exhibited over 2800 animals, 2,600 general proj- ects, delivered over 200 pub- lic presentations and partici- pated in dozens of group learning experiences and public performances at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. Education is integral in the "learn by doing" philosophy of 4-H; livestock exhibitors participate in interviews and general exhibits are confer- enced judged. Area students included on the list: Hunnter Bloch - Champion: Breeding girt showperson - intermediate division; Purple: Swine - Crossbred, February~ gilt Tabitha Krueger-Buss: Blue: Creative/applied pho- tography - grades 9+ Hannah Wichmann - Blue: Dairy - Holstein, grade - win- ter calf; Blue: fine arts - grades 6-8 Q: What should I do if I find zebra mussels while removing my dock or boat lift from the water this fall? A: If you fmd zebra mus- sels or other aquatic invasive species that have not been confirmed on the lake before, please note the exact location, take a photo and keep a sample for positive identification. Go to www.mndnr.gov/invasives/ ais/contacts.html to find an aquatic invasive species spe- cialist or call 888-646-6367. You may place the dock or lift on the adjacent shoreline, but you must remove all aquat- ic plants and animals before transporting it to another loca- tion for storage, cleaning or repair. A boat lift, dock, swim raft, or associated equipment that has been removed from any water body may not be placed in another water body until a minimum of 21 days have passed. If you are hiring a service provider to transport your equipment, make sure they are permitted by the DNR. You can fred a list of permitted lake services providers on the DNR website at www.dnr.state. mn.us/lsp. - Heidi Wolf, invasive spe- cies unit supervisor IRACIORS 500VERSATILE, %3HRS .............................................. $199,909 535 VERSATILE, 925 H RS ............................................. S179,900 290 VERSATILE, FWA, SS, PS, 335H RS ..................... 5124,900 260VERSATILE, 170 HRS ............................................. 5119,900 221011BV FWA, SS, PS, 2230 HRS ............................... %4,900 214511 BV,2WD, 4603 HRS ............................................ %9,900 T8.360 NH,940 HRS, CERTIFIED PREOwNED._..._..5154,900 TG255 NH, 1935 HRS ...................................................... 594,9(X) T7.245 NH, AUTO-COMMAND, 230HRS .......................... CALf T6.180 NH, 70HRS ................................................................ CALL T6.155 NH,8451L LOADER, 150 HRS ................................ CALL 8970 NH, FWA, SS, PS, 5115 H P6 ................................ S59,9~0 8670 NH, 5910 HP6, 2WD ............................................. 542,900 TO3D NN, 2700 HRS, W/LOADER ................................ 5t2,000 2-180 WHITE, 2 WD, D,(i~O URS .................................. $10500 T5.115 NB, 135 HRS, lOADER READY ......................... 559,9(30 HAY EQUIPMENT 7450 NH MOWER CONDITIONER ............................... 524,900 BB940A NH SQUARE BALER ...................................... 539,900 BRTOBA, TWINE & ND, D,800 BALES ....................... 519,500 BR780 NH BALER, TWINE, 8,5,00 BALES .................. 517,900 678 NH BALER, TWINE ................................................... $8,500 499NH ............................................................................... $4,950 617 NH DISC MOWER ..................................................... ~1,9B0 NEWTONUTTI 9WHEEL RAKE ...................................... %,950 SITREX $R%3W, 9WHEEL RAKE .................................. $5,450 COMBINES CR8OgONH,6S7 HRS ................................................. COMINGIN CR907O NH, 851 HP6 .................................................... $199,900 CR9060 NH, 764HP6 ...................................................... 5169,900 CR9060 NH, 848 HRS ..................................................... S159'9C0 CORN HEADS 99(: NH 12R30 ................................................................. 574,900 99( N H 81DO. .................................................................. $39,900 830 HARVEBTEC .............................................................. 524,900 974 NH 8R30 ..................................................................... $8'900 643 JD. .................................................................................. 55,000 SKIDLoADERS 1228 NH, CABIHEAT/ACIHI FLOW 140 HR5 ................ $42500 1.225 NH, CABIHEATIAC HI FLOW 895 HR5 ................. 537,900 1220 NN, CAD/Rg~T, 465 HR5 ......................................... 531,500 L220 NH, CAB/NEAT, 1 I00 HRS ....................................... 529,900 SV250 CIH, CABIHEATIAC, 385 HRS ............................... $32,900 PLANTING 3600 KINK ASD MECH. 16/31 ...................................... SI09,900 3600 KINZE 16R30 ............................................................. $49,900 3600 KINZE ]6/31 ............................................................... $44,900 3200 KINZE 12R30, 2500 ACRES, NICE .......................... $41'900 7200JD 16R30 ...................................................................... 519,900 7000JD 16R30 ........................................................................ 59,900 EF KINZE 8R36WI5 INTERPCANTS .................................... 56,900 375 DLX WACALE FRIEBEN TENDER ............................. 110 BST FRIESEN TENDER .................................................. 59,950 TILLAGI: 50'QUAD 5 WIL-RICH, 4 BAR ........................................... $16,900 46'QUAD SWIL RICH, 4 BAR .......................................... 516,900 25'DMITM, 3BAR ............................................................... $]2,900 285 4800 CIH, 3 RAR .......................................................... $7,900 3t'4800 CIH, 3 BAR .............................................................. 56,900 513 501LPROWIL RICH,9 24 .................................... 544200 357WIL-RICH 5-30 ............................................................ 511500 2700 JD 9-24 ........................................................................ $11,900 5 30DMI ............................................................................. $5,900 5850WlL-RICH 3TCHISEL PLOW ................................... $26,9~3 GRAIN HEADS 740 CF NH 35'. ................................................................. $31,900 740 CE N H 30'. .................................................................. $28,500 74C NH 35'W/ERARY AIR ............................................ 529,900 74(: NH 30'WKRARY NR ........................................... $27'900 74C N H 30'. ...................................................................... Sq 4,900 FD70 MACDON 40: ........................................................ 553,500 MISCELLANEOUS 1050 ROW CROP, KINZE CARE, TARP & SCALE .....$42,900 850 KINZE CART, TARR ................................................... 533,500 1108 FRONTIER 6ARL ................................................... $16,900 690 KILLBROS CART. ...................................................... $8,900 2500 HD REM VAC ........................................................... $9,900 42'MANDAKO LAND ROLLER, DEMO UNiT ............. $35,000 -Farm -General Land Improvement Mike Onken 50 7'- 734-3150 Lyle Onken[ 507-530-3233 Balaton, MN. & Nunda SD. 507-530-1233 [ BASEMENTS PADS HoG/CATTLE BARNS DEMOLITION GROVE REMOVAL 2756 181sT ST. CURRIE MN 56123 _J LYLE NOOMEN OWNER 507-530-1432 251903 D'